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Living Well with Diabetes

Putting Your Meal Plan Into Action Consult your meal plan before you go to the store. Decide ahead of time what you want to cook and make a list. This helps you stay on track while you shop. At the grocery store, read food labels to help you make the healthiest choices. If you don’t do the shopping, be sure the person who does understands your needs. Nutrition Facts Serving Size 1 cup (240g) Servings Per Container 2 Amount Per Serving Calories 100 Calories from Fat 20 29 % Daily Value* Total Fat 2g 3% Saturated Fat 0g 0% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 70mg 3% Total Carbohydrate 17g 6% Dietary Fiber 3g 12% Sugars 5g Protein 4g Vitamin A 70% • Vitamin C 20% Calcium 15% • Iron 8% *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Serving Size This tells you how much of the food makes up one serving. If you eat more than one serving, all the other values increase. Saturated Fat This is the total amount of saturated fat in each serving. Limit saturated fats and avoid trans fats. Both are bad for your health. Sodium A healthy meal plan with less salt can help you control your blood pressure. Limit your salt to no more than 2,300 mg each day if you have diabetes. For people with both diabetes and high blood pressure, a further reduction in sodium may be necessary. Total Carbohydrate This tells you how many grams of carbohydrate are in one serving. If you do carb counting, this number helps you fit the food into your meal plan. When You’re Shopping Look for the “Nutrition Facts” label on packaged foods. It tells you how much of the food makes up one serving. It also tells you how much carbohydrate and fat are in each serving. This will help you decide if the food fits into your meal plan. • Look for brightly colored fruits and vegetables. • Buy lean meats, such as chicken, turkey, and fish. • Avoid high-fat snack food aisles. • Look for whole-grain foods and low-fat dairy products. When You’re Cooking Use the following tips to help you prepare healthier, diabetesfriendly meals at home: • Trim fat off meats before cooking. • Broil, steam, bake, or grill meats and vegetables instead of frying. • Use olive or canola oil instead of butter or lard for cooking. • Don’t cook meat and vegetables in cream- or butter-based sauces.


Living Well with Diabetes
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