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Living Well with Diabetes

Chapter 5: Taking Medication Taking Medication for Diabetes Like healthy eating and physical activity, taking medication can help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Glucose-lowering medications improve your ability to keep your blood glucose in your target range. Similarly, blood pressure and cholesterol medications help keep those levels within your target ranges. Learn About Your Medications The next three pages will tell you about the different types of glucose-lowering medications and how they work. Many people take one or more medications to help manage their diabetes. Talk with your health care provider, diabetes educator, nurse, or pharmacist and learn the names of your medications. Then have him or her help you fill out the chart on page 41. Where the Diabetes Medications Work Talk to your health care provider about your medications. Medications affect different parts of the body. For instance, some medications increase insulin sensitivity in cells. Some prevent the liver from making and releasing too much glucose. Some cause carbohydrates to break down more slowly in the digestive tract. Some stimulate the pancreas to produce and release more insulin. Some cause excess glucose to be eliminated in the urine. The diagram below shows where different glucose-lowering medications work. For the chart on the next page, talk to your health care provider about the medications you are taking and how they work. Muscle and fat cells Liver Kidneys Large intestine Small intestine Pancreas (behind stomach) 40


Living Well with Diabetes
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